About WPWMA

The WPWMA is a regional agency established in 1978 through a joint exercise of powers agreement between Placer County and the cities of Lincoln, Rocklin and Roseville to own, operate and maintain a sanitary landfill and all related improvements.

The WPWMA’s facilities consist of the Western Regional Sanitary Landfill and a Materials Recovery Facility which includes composting, Household Hazardous Waste, and recycling and buyback facilities.

MRF

The Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) assists Placer County jurisdictions with achieving state mandated waste diversion goals while achieving an economy of scale for material diversion and providing uniformity in waste diversion and recycling programs. The MRF was designed and is operated to: 1) recover recyclable materials from mixed waste; 2) process green and wood wastes for composting or biomass; 3) receive and process source-separated recyclables, and 4) provide for receipt and recycling/disposal of HHW. Materials not recovered via MRF processing are disposed in the Western Regional Sanitary Landfill.

Western Regional Sanitary Landfill

The Western Regional Sanitary Landfill began operations in 1979 and is the only remaining active landfill in Placer County. The WRSL is currently permitted to receive waste thorugh January 2058. The WRSL’s environmental protection measures include Subtitle D-compliant liners in the active waste disposal modules, leachate and condensate collection and removal systems, a landfill gas collection system and perimeter gas monitoring probes, and a groundwater monitoring network.

Energy 2001

The WPWMA leases approximately 15,000 square feet of land and delivers landfill gas to a private company, Energy 2001, for the purposes of generating electricity. Energy 2001’s onsite plant currently consists of six CAT 3516 engines and a small flare. Electricity produced by Energy 2001 is fed into the local power grid and sold to the Marin Energy Authority.

Energy 2001 also owns and operates a 9KW commercial solar array in partnership with Sierra College. Energy produced by the solar array is used to power the WRSL’s landfill gas collection equipment.